OPINION

OPINION #1

BEST 5 IMAGES 

AGNES WATERS BEACH HOUSE

 

This image was created early in my career and was shot using a 4x5 film Linhof and 210mm Schneider lens. The purpose of the shot was to both contextually show the house within the very isolated and rough environment and to demonstrate the nighttime lighting constraints residences have in turtle habitat areas. A daytime shot of the house from the same location yields very little detail as the structure disappears back into the thick landscape. Overall the shot took just on two hours to create. After initially setting up on a neighbouring residence’s floor framing I had to wait until the right moment to commit this shot to film. Digital capture practices of today may have allowed enough time to return back to site and capture additional frames but this was the only shot taken for that evening. This is one picture that tells a thousand words.

AGNES WATERS BEACH HOUSE

 

ARCHITECT : TIM DITCHFIELD ARCHITECTS

EQUIPMENT : 4X5 LINHOF TECHNIKARDEN WITH 210mm SCHNEIDER LENS / FIJI VELVIA / f8 @ 15sec

SHANGHAI TOWER

I was in Shanghai completing a 4 week commission for AECOM shooting various sites around central China. For the first four days we isolated in our apartment rooms waiting for both fog and smog to clear from the city. The fifth day saw me out wandering around in the pre dawn and essentially presented me with the opportunity to capture some amazing shots of the Shanghai Tower for Gensler at a stage we call Topping Out for tall buildings. It is a very rare occurrence that you get such clear and crisp conditions in Shanghai coupled with an amazingly clean and reflective skin wrapping the building.

SHANGHAI TOWER

 

ARCHITECT : GENSLER

EQUIPMENT : 32mm RODENSTOCK ON CAMBO TECH FRAME / PHASEONE IQ130 BACK / f8 @ 1/8th sec ISO 50

ONEDIN

 

Each and every architectural career is dotted with landmark projects that define that person’s work. I have had the privilege of working with and shooting Shaun Lockyer’s residential creations for the past 16 years. In this particular instance ONEDIN, located at the top of the range heading into Toowoomba, Queensland, is one such residence that not only created a defining moment for architect but also gave me the opportunity to shoot a house in a purist approach to architectural photography. There is no ‘little moments’, no cushions, no dogs just raw power, perspective, scale and materiality. This shot was even more special having been taken at 4am in the morning to replicate a ‘dusk’ scene. A setting western sun only provided a very dull and blue toned sky. I was after something a bit more vibrant and warmer in tones, hence a dawn approach. I just love the power and perspective of this image. I know I got the right angle, the right perspective, the right scale and definitely the right time of day

ONEDIN

ARCHITECT : SHAUN LOCKYER

EQUIPMENT : 32mm RODENSTOCK ON CAMBO TECH FRAME / PHASEONE IQ3 TRICHROMATIC BACK / f8 @ 2 sec ISO 50

TELSTRA BOX

 

Sometimes images just happen out of nowhere. I had driven past this particular location many times in transit to other areas. But a chance commission in Warwick, Queensland allowed me to factor in a few more dawn hours prior to arriving on site for my intended shoot. In a world of mobile phones the humble public telephone booth is a rare site, even more so when it is stuck out in the middle of nowhere and still connected. The light spilling out of it into the darkness has always reminded me of that movie “The Last Stargazer”, but obviously the booth is not a video game machine. I also never intended to shoot it in colour. The inky blackness of the pre dawn just lends itself to creating a very dark and moody black and white capture.

TELSTRA BOX

EQUIPMENT : 70mm RODENSTOCK ON CAMBO TECH FRAME / PHASEONE IQ3 TRICHROMATIC BACK / f8 @ 15sec ISO 50

BMX BANDITS

 

Without a doubt this is my most favourite image to date after 19 years of shooting architecture commercially. It was an image that had a little bit of planning to it and a whole lot of luck.

 

I was commissioned by Guymer Bailey Architects to photograph their recent aquatic centre project in Maryborough, Queensland, Australia. As part of the project a new front facade entry element was created out of an opaque printed vinyl which when illuminated by the afternoon sun also provided additional natural light to the indoor swimming pool in behind it.

 

I knew that I wanted to capture the entire wall in a single elevational shot and that including a few people / swimmers into the mix would give the image extra activation and context as to what the facility is. Water aerobics finished up at 1pm so this would give me the perfect chance at someone walking past. What I didn’t know was what was going to happen next.

 

Patrons started to funnel out and go their separate ways but it was these two ladies that caught my attention. You could not get anymore dressed up for the pool. Kitted out with swim bags, noodles and thongs they headed off down the path straight across my scene. But it was a split second later that the local BMX crew came screaming past out of nowhere and gave me the additional interest in the shot that I was after. Now keep in mind that school does not finish until 3pm so I think they were a little surprised that someone was filing them playing ‘hooky’ from school. The ring leader even thought he would pose tough for the shot as they sped past.

 

Some would say that the image is rather plain architecturally but it is the contextual story within that makes it more compelling and certainly Australian.